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Resources

NAIHC Resolutions

2016 Resolutions

Seven resolutions were passed during the Annual Members’ Meeting on May 9-11, 2016 in Honolulu, Hawaii.

Shawn Pensoneau, Director of the Office of Governmental Affairs can answer any questions at spensoneau@naihc.net or 202-454-0928.

2016 Resolutions:

RESOLUTION #2016-01 A RESOLUTION IN SUPPORT OF RETAINING TRAINING AND TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE (T&TA) WITHIN THE OFFICE OF NATIVE AMERICAN PROGRAMS
Resolution 2016 – 01

RESOLUTION #2016-02 A RESOLUTION URGING CONGRESS TO CONTINUE TO PROVIDE ADEQUATE FUNDING LEVELS FOR NATIVE AMERICAN HOUSING PROGRAMS
Resolution 2016 – 02

RESOLUTION #2016-03 A RESOLUTION URGING HUD AND THE CONGRESS OF THE UNITED STATES TO INCLUDE TRIBES AND TRIBALLY DESIGNATED HOUSING ENTITIES IN THE SECTION 8 HOUSING VOUCHER PROGRAM TO PROVIDE RENTAL ASSISTANCE
Resolution 2016 – 03

RESOLUTION #2016-04 A RESOLUTION SUPPORTING SENATOR MARIA CANTWELL’S PROPOSAL TO EXPAND THE ANNUAL LOW INCOME HOUSING TAX CREDIT PROGRAM ALLOCATION BY 50 PERCENT
Resolution 2016 – 04

RESOLUTION #2016-05 A RESOLUTION DEMANDING THAT THE US DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT (HUD) CEASE AND DESIST USE OF THE “LOCCS EDIT” UNTIL AFTER COMPLYING WITH NOTICE AND HEARING REQUIREMENTS OF 24 CFR 1000
Resolution 2016 – 05

RESOLUTION #2016-06 A RESOLUTION IN SUPPORT OF ESTABLISHING A TEMPORARY NAIHC HOUSING FUNDING TASK FORCE
Resolution 2016 – 06

RESOLUTOIN #2016-07 A RESOLUTION SUPPORTING IMMEDIATE REAUTHORIZATION OF THE NATIVE AMERICAN HOUSING ASSISTANCE AND SELF-DETERMINATION ACT
Resolution 2016 – 07

2015 Resolutions

Two resolutions were passed during the Annual Members’ Meeting on June 14, 2015, in Scottsdale, AZ.

Shawn Pensoneau, Director of the Office of Governmental Affairs can answer any questions at spensoneau@naihc.net or 202-454-0928.

2015 Resolutions

RESOLUTION #2015 – 01: A RESOLUTION UPON CONGRESS AND THE US DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT (HUD) TO HONOR THE CONGRESSIONAL INTENT OF SECTION 703 OF THE NATIVE AMERICAN HOUSING ASSISTANCE AND SELF-DETERMINATION ACT AND RESTORE FULL FUNDING TO THE NATIONAL AMERICAN INDIAN HOUSING COUNCIL

Resolution #2015-01


RESOLUTION #2015 – 02: A RESOLUTION IN SUPPORT OF FY 2016 HUD INDIAN HOUSING BLOCK GRAND FUNDING

Resolution #2015-02


2014 Resolutions

2014 Resolutions

RESOLUTION #2014 – 01: A RESOLUTION URGING THE SENATE TO PASS SENATE BILL 1352 – REAUTHORIZATION OF NAHASDA AND INCREASE CONGRESSIONAL APPROPRIATIONS OVER ITS FIVE YEAR TERM

Resolution #2014-01-063014


RESOLUTION #2014 – 02: A RESOLUTION CALLING ON THE 113TH CONGRESS OF THE UNITES STATES TO ENACT AND EXPAND THE PROVISIONS OF HOUSE BILLS 4277 AND 4329 TITLED, “TO REAUTHORIZE THE NATIVE AMERICAN HOUSING ASSISTANCE AND SELF‐DETERMINATION ACT OF 1996 AND FOR OTHER PURPOSES” PARTICULARLY AS RELATED TO ESTABLISHING TIMELINES FOR HUD TO ACT AND ESTABLISHING CONSEQUENCES FOR HUD’S FAILURE TO ACT WITHIN THOSE TIMELINES

Resolution #2014-02-063014


RESOLUTION #2014 – 03: A RESOLUTION TO SUPPORT REAUTHORIZATION OF TITLE VIII OF NAHASDA AS PART OF THE OVERALL REAUTHORIZATION OF NAHASDA PROGRAMS

Resolution #2014-03-063014

Government Links

U.S. Census Bureau
U.S. Census Bureau is conducting the 2017 Boundary & Annexation Survey (BAS).

The Tribal BAS allows the Census Bureau to correctly count your community’s residents and the federal government uses Census Bureau data to allocate more than $400 billion annually in federal funds for infrastructure, programs, and services.

You will not need to fill out the form:

If your tribe has no changes to report to the reservation or off-reservation trust land boundary that the Census Bureau has on file for them, please email Vbutterbredt@naihc.net or geobas@census.gov.

You will need to submit the survey, if your tribe meets any of the above criteria, please have the tribe fill out the annual response form online.

  1. A tribe has changes to the reservation or off-reservation trust land boundaries that the Census Bureau has on file for them
  2. A tribe has new reservation or off-reservation trust land to report
  • A tribe would like to view the boundaries that the Census Bureau has on file for their reservation and off-reservation trust land

2017 BAS US Census Bureau Form

Department of Housing and Urban Development
More information to be provided.

Department of Housing and Urban Development

Department of Housing and Urban Development HUD Office of Native American Programs
More information to be provided.

HUD Office of Native American Programs

Department of Agriculture

Contact Office of Tribal Relations

The Office of Tribal Relations is the lead Agency that works with all USDA Mission Areas to stay advised and involved in the formal process of consultation with Tribal governments. The Office of Tribal Relations also works with the Office of Intergovernmental and External Affairs, the Office of General Counsel, the Senior Policy Team, and other key offices working across USDA. OTR also works with counterparts in other Federal agencies to achieve these goals.

To request additional information on consultation, or assistance with other USDA issues, please contact:

Main Office: (202) 205-2249
Fax: (202) 720-1058
Mailing Address:
Room 500-A Whitten Building
Department of Agriculture
1400 Independence Avenue, SW
Washington, D.C. 20250

Acting Director
Linda Cronin
linda.cronin@osec.usda.gov

Senior Policy Advisor
Abby Cruz
abigail.cruz@osec.usda.gov

Lead Outreach Coordinator
Josiah Griffin
josiah.griffin@osec.usda.gov

Administrative Assistant
Cynthia Jones
cynthia.jones@osec.usda.gov

Department of Agriculture

Rural Development
More information to be provided.

Rural Development

Department of Energy
DOE Office of Indian Energy Policy and Programs
Department of the Interior
Bureau of Indian Affairs
Indian Health Service
Department of Justice
Environmental Protection Agency
Office of Management and Budget
United States Interagency Council on Homelessness

Community Housing Projects Funding Resources

Community Facilities Guaranteed Loan (CF Guarantee)- YEAR-ROUND
Program
Application Timeline
Agency Eligible Applicants Eligibility Requirements Authorized Purposes Typical Amount of Assistance Rates and Terms Subject to Change
Community Facilities Guaranteed Loan (CF Guarantee)

Year-Round

Rural Development,
USDA
Organizations, Tribes Cities, towns, unincorporated areas with less than 20,000 population The loans can be used for real estate and equipment-type projects, including but not limited to public homeless shelters and senior care facilities $100,000 – $10 million Up to 90% loan guarantee with rates negotiated between borrower and lender – fixed or variable rates

Community Facilities Direct Loan, (CF Direct)- YEAR-ROUND
Community Facilities Direct Loan (CF Direct)

Year-Round

Rural Development,
USDA
Organizations, Tribes Cities, towns, unincorporated areas with less than 20,000 in population The loans can be used for real estate and equipment-type projects, including but not limited to public homeless shelters and senior care facilities $100,000 – $5 million Market rates fixed; 40 years maximum

Community Facilities Grants (CF Grant)- YEAR-ROUND
Community Facilities Grants (CF Grant)

Year-Round

Rural Development,
USDA
Organizations, Tribes Cities, towns, unincorporated areas with less than 20,000 population The grants can be used for real estate and equipment-type projects, including but not limited to public homeless shelters and senior care centers $15,000 – $50,000 Grant

Indian Housing Block Grant (IHBG)- NC

 

Summary:
The Native American Housing Assistance and Self-Determination Act of 1996 (NAHASDA) reorganized the system of Federal housing assistance to Native Americans by eliminating several separate programs and replacing them with a single block grant program that recognizes the right of Indian self-determination and tribal self-governance. It provides for tribal governing bodies to name a tribally designated housing entity (TDHE)-which may be the former Indian Housing Authority-to prepare an Indian Housing Plan (IHP).

Purpose:
NAHASDA aims to simplify the process of Federal housing assistance for Indian tribes and to make such assistance better fit the circumstances of Native Americans. It became effective October 1, 1997. It replaces assistance previously authorized under the Housing Act of 1937, the Indian Housing Child Development Program, the Public Housing Youth Sports Program, and the HOME Investment Partnership Program under the Cranston-Gonzalez National Affordable Housing Act, and the Innovative Homeless Demonstration Program. Some existing contracts will remain in force until they expire or are renegotiated.

Type of Assistance:
Assistance is in the form of a block grant made available on an annual basis using an allocation formula for Indian tribes with approved IHPs.

Eligible Grantees:
Eligible Indian tribes and Alaska Native villages designate who will receive the block grant.

Eligible Customers:
The block grant serves the housing needs of low-income American Indians and Alaska Natives.

Eligible Activities:
Eligible affordable housing activities must develop or support rental or ownership housing or provide housing services to benefit low-income Indian families on Indian reservations and other Indian areas. Affordable housing must cost no more than 30 percent of the family’s adjusted income. Eligible activities include modernization or operating assistance for housing previously developed using HUD resources; acquisition, new construction, or rehabilitation of additional units; housing-related services such as housing counseling, self-sufficiency services, energy auditing, and establishment of resident organizations; housing management services; crime prevention and safety activities; rental assistance; model activities; and administrative expenses.

Application:
Every tribe that submits an IHP (which is approved) is awarded a block grant. The IHP has two parts: a 5-year plan and a 1-year plan. The 5-year plan must contain a mission statement, goals, objectives, and an activities plan. The 1-year plan must contain goals, objectives, a statement of needs, an operating budget, a statement of the affordable housing resources currently available, and certifications of compliance.

Funding Status:
In fiscal year 1998, $600 million was appropriated to the IHBG.

Technical Guidance:
The NAHASDA authorized the IHBG program, which replaces the Indian housing programs under the Housing Act of 1937. Section 106 of NAHASDA establishes the procedure for developing the regulations for the program. Regulations will be found in 24 CFR, Part 1000. NAHASDA is administered by Jacqueline Johnson, Deputy Assistant Secretary of the Office of Native American Programs (ONAP).

For More Information:
More information is available from the National ONAP in Denver, Colorado, by calling: (303) 675-1600 or visit the NAHASDA Indian Housing Plan home page.

Indian Housing Block Grant (IHBG)

NC

HUD , Tribes Federally recognized tribe/villages as well as one of 5 state recognized tribes HUD provides block-grant funds to tribe or tribally designated housing authority supporting housing for low-to-moderate income residents on tribal lands $650 million Varies (distributed according to formula)

Title VI Loan Program- YEAR-ROUND

 For More Information

Title VI Loan Leveraging Program

Year-Round

Office of Native American Programs,
HUD
 Tribes Federally recognized tribe/villages as well as one of 5 state recognized tribes Tribes leveage their IHBG funds for larger scale projects to provide housing for low-to-moderate income residents on tribal lands $2 million for entire program Varies

Indian Community Development Block Grant (ICDBG)- ANNUALLY

 

Indian Community Development Block Grant (ICDBG)

Annually

Office of Native American Programs,
HUD
Tribes Federally recognized tribe/villages and a few state recognized tribes Infrastructure and other activites related to housing and community development $60 million Varies

CDFI Bond Guarantee Program- ANNUALLY
CDFI Bond Guarantee Program

Annually*

Community Development Financial Institutions Fund (CDFI Fund), Treasury Organization Certified CDFIs and entities designated by Certified CDFIs (i.e., Qualified Issuers). Provides a source of long-term  debt to CDFIs and the CDFIs use the debt capital  to lend in Low-Income or Underserved Rural Areas to spur economic development.

Guaranteed bonds may be used to provide long-term capital to finance small businesses, rental housing, rural infrastructure, healthcare facilities, senior living facilities, charter schools, and other asset classes.

Min. Bond Issue size of $100 million that includes a max. of 10 Bond Loans of $10 million each.

FY 2016 budget requests Guarantee Authority not to exceed $1 billion annually.

Negotiated between borrower and the CDFI Fund. Maximum Bond and Bond Loan maturies of 29.5 years.  Fixed interest rates based on the Federal Financing Bank rates.   The Bonds are non-recourse obligations of the Qualified Issuers and the Bond Loans are secured and general recourse obligations of the Eligible CDFIs.

New Markets Tax Credit Program- ANNUALLY
New Markets Tax Credit Program

Annually*

Community Development Financial Institutions Fund (CDFI Fund), Treasury Organization Community Development Entities (CDEs) certified by CDFI Fund receive, through a competitive process, authority to issue New Market Tax Credits (NMTCs).  All Native CDFIs are eligible to be certified as CDEs. CDEs use funds raised through NMTCs to offer loans, equity investments and financial counseling and related services to Qualified Active Low Income Community Businesses located in Low-Income Communities. Average tax credit allocation authority of approximately $50 million per CDE. N/A

Capital Magnet Fund- ANNUALLY
Capital Magnet Fund

Annually*

Community Development Financial Institutions Fund (CDFI Fund), Treasury Organizations Certified CDFIs and qualified nonprofit housing organizations CMF awards grants to CDFIs and qualified non-profit housing organizations. Funds can be used to finance affordable housing activities as well as related economic development activities and community service facilities. Grants N/A

Native American CDFI Assistance Program (NACA Program)- Technical Assistance ANNUALLY
Native American CDFI Assistance Program (NACA Program) – Financial Assistance

Annually

Community Development Financial Institutions Fund (CDFI Fund), Treasury Organizations Certified CDFIs that primarily serve Native Communities (Native CDFIs) and have a track record of serving Native Communities.

Applicant income limits apply.

To build Native CDFIs’ financial capacity to lend to support access to capital and credit in Native communities. The funds can be used in five categories:
·Financial Products;
·Financial Services;
· Loan Loss Reserves;
· Development Services; and
· Capital Reserves.
$12 million for FY 2015 Funding Round in total.  FA awards can be in the form of loans, grants, Equity Investments, and deposits and credit union shares. The form of the FA award
is based on the form of the matching
funds.

Native American CDFI Assistance Program (NACA Program)- Financial Assistance ANNUALLY
Native American CDFI Assistance Program (NACA Program) – Technical Assistance

Annually

Community Development Financial Institutions Fund (CDFI Fund), Treasury Organizations Native CDFIS, organizations that propose to create a Native CDFI, and emerging Native CDFIs .

Applicant income limits apply.

To build Certified, Certifiable, and Emerging CDFIs’ organizational capacity to serve their groups’ Target Market, and
Sponsoring Entities’ ability to create
Certified CDFIs that serve Native
Communities.
$3 million for FY 2015 Funding Round in total. Grant

Housing Application Packaging Grants
Housing Application Packaging Grants

N/A

Rural Development,
USDA
Organizations Tax exempt public agencies and private non-profit organizations Grant

Single Family Housing Assistance Funding Resources

Single Family Housing Repair Loan (504) Program
Single Family Housing Repair Loan (504) Program

Year-Round

Rural Development,
USDA
Tribal Members Unincorporated areas, cities with less than 10,000 population, and some cities with less than 20,000 that are not part of an urban area.

Income must be at or below 50% of the county median income level for each family size  Applicants must currently own and occupy the home

Loans may be used to repair, improve, or modernize homes or remove health and safety hazards $20,000 maximum outstanding loan at any time Interest rate is 1% fixed rate with a maximum loan term of 20 years determined by repayment ability

Single Family Housing Guarantee Loan (502 Guarantee)
Single Family Housing Guarantee Loan (502 Guarantee)

Year-Round

Rural Development,
USDA
Tribal Members Unincorporated areas, cities with less than 10,000 population, and some cities with less than 20,000 that are not part of an urban area.

Applicant income limits apply.

Buy, build, improve, repair, or rehabilitate a rural home as the applicant’s primary and permanent residence exceed appraised value Up to 100% of the market value of the home, not to exceed repayment ratios of 29 and 41% for PITI and TD respectively. Guarantee fee can be included Mortgage lender’s interest rate is negotiated but is fixed; 30 years; guarantee fee applies

Farm Labor Housing for On-Farm Housing
Farm Labor Housing for On-Farm Housing

Year-Round, NC

Rural Development,
USDA
Tribal Members, Tribes Individual farmers, farm partnerships, farm corporations, and farm associations Construction of new on-farm housing or acquisition and rehabilitation of  existing on-farm housing Maximum loan is 100% of total project development cost 1% fixed; 33 years

Repair & Renovation

Single Family Housing Repair Loan (504) Program
Single Family Housing Repair Loan (504) Program

Year-Round

Rural Development,
USDA
Tribal Members Unincorporated areas, cities with less than 10,000 population, and some cities with less than 20,000 that are not part of an urban area.

Income must be at or below 50% of the county median income level for each family size  Applicants must currently own and occupy the home

Loans may be used to repair, improve, or modernize homes or remove health and safety hazards $20,000 maximum outstanding loan at any time Interest rate is 1% fixed rate with a maximum loan term of 20 years determined by repayment ability

Single Family Housing Repair Grant (504 Grant)
Single Family Housing Repair Grant (504 Grant)

Year-Round

Rural Development,
USDA
Tribal Members Unincorporated areas, cities with less than 10,000 population, and some cities with less than 20,000 that are not part of an urban area.

Applicants with income at or below 50% of the median income limit for the county in which they reside, that own their home, and are at least 62 years of age or older.

Grants must be used to correct health and safety hazards or to provide accessibility to households with disabilities $7,500 lifetime maximum Grant recipient must live in dwelling 3 years after the grant is made or repay the grant funds

Housing Preservation Grant (HPG 533 Grant)
Housing Preservation Grant (HPG 533 Grant)

Annually

Rural Development,
USDA
Organizations, Tribes Rural areas, cities with less than 10,000 population and some cities with less than 5,000 population Any program that offers affordable assistance (loans, grants, subsidies, technical assistance, etc.) to repair low income housing $60,000 – $150,000 Grant

Multi-family Housing Preservation and Revitalization Loans and Grants (MPR)
Multi-family Housing Preservation and Revitalization Loans and Grants (MPR)

Annually*

Rural Development,
USDA
Organizations Section 514, 515, and 516 borrowers · Preserve and improve existing Rural Rental Housing and Off-Farm Labor Housing projects in order to extend their affordable use without displacing tenants through increased rents
·A third party Capital Needs Assessment (CNA) will help identify project needs.
Limited funding Varies

Weatherization Assistance Program
Weatherization Assistance Program DOE Tribes Section 514, 515, and 516 borrowers in States, Territories, and Some Indian Tribes Provides grants to states, territories, and some Indian tribes to improve the energy efficiency of the homes of low-income families Approximately $6,500 per home

Rental & Mortgage Assistance

Rural Rental Housing Direct Loan (515 Loan) Annually
Rural Rental Housing Direct Loan (515 Loan)

Annually

Rural Development,
USDA
Organizations, Tribal Members, Tribes Tribal land and areas with population 2,500 up to 10,000. Additional eligibility requirements may apply. Develop new rental housing $1 million maximum 1% fixed (using interest credit); 30 years with 50-year amortization

Guaranteed Rural Rental Housing Loan (GRRH 538 Loan) Year-Round
Guaranteed Rural Rental Housing Loan (GRRH 538 Loan)

Year-Round

Rural Development,
USDA
Organizations, Tribal Members, Tribes Cities, counties and areas with less than 10,000 population AND some cities and areas with less than 25,000 population Loans for new construction, purchase and rehabilitation/renovation of existing apartments No maximum or minimum amount Negotiated between borrwer and lender. (USDA may provide interest credit to reduce the effective interest rate)

Rental Assistance Program Year-Round
Rental Assistance Program

Year-Round

Rural Development,
USDA
Tribal Members Property: Section 514 and 515 borrowers; AND Tenants: Persons with disabilities or income less than 80% of area median income, and unable to pay the basic monthly rent may petition the 514 or 515 borrower to apply for RA RenUSDA provides subsidy to multi-family housing complex owner for rental assistance Makes up the difference between the tenant’s contribution (30% of adjusted income) and the monthly rental rate N/A

Indian Loan Guarantee Program (Section 184) Year-Round
Indian Loan Guarantee Program (Section 184)

Year-Round

Office of Native American Programs,
HUD
Tribal Members Provide access to loan financing for Native American (or AIAN) families and tribes, guaranteeing the mortgage of a prospective mortgage applicant $6 million Varies

Making Home Affordable (MHA) / Home Affordable Modification Program (HAMP) Year-Round
Making Home Affordable (MHA) / Home Affordable Modification Program (HAMP)

Year-Round

Office of Financial Stability ,
Treasury
Tribal Members Homeowners may be eligible for MHA programs if:
·Due to financial hardship, they are struggling to make their mortgage payments.
·They are behind or in danger of falling behind on their mortgage.
·They owned the home before January 2009 and the  property has not been condemned.
·They owe up to $729,750 on their primary residence or one-to-four unit rental property (loan limits are higher for two- to four-unit properties).
·They have not been convicted within the last 10 years of a crime in connection with a mortgage or real estate transaction.
Assist homeowners struggling with their monthly mortgage payments by lowering their mortgage payments, refinancing at lower interest rates, getting help if mortgage balance exceeds property value, or helping the applicant to transition to more affordable housing through a short sale or deed-in-lieu..

Making Home Affordable (MHA) / Home Affordable Refinance Program (HARP)
Making Home Affordable (MHA) / Home Affordable Refinance Program (HARP) Federal Housing Finance Agency Tribal Members Homeowners (1) whose loan-to-value (LTV) ratio exceeds 80%, (2) whose mortgage loans are owned by Freddie Mac or Fannie Mae, (3) who owned the home before May 31, 2009, (4) who made no late mortgage payments in the plast 6 months and no more than one late payment in the past year, and (5) whose home is a primary residence, a 1-unit second home, or a 1- to 4-unit investment property. Assist homeowners whose home values have declined, and who are unable to refinance their mortgage loans at current low interest rates becaue they have little, no or negative home equity. Program is extended until the end of 2016.

Veterans Affairs

Veteran Affairs Homeless Providers Grant and Per Diem (GPD) Program Annually
Veteran Affairs Homeless Providers Grant and Per Diem (GPD) Program

Annually

 Heatlth Care for Homeless Veterans Prgram (HCHV),
VA
Organizations; Tribes only programs with supportive housing (up to 24 months) or service cetners are eligible for these funds Purpose is to promote the development and provision of supportive housing and/or supportive services with the goal of helping homeless Veterans achieve residential stability, increase their skills levels and/or income, and obtain greater self-determination. Grants: limit is 65% of csots of construction, renovation, ro acquisition of a building for use as service centers or traditional housing for homless Veterans PerDiem: maximum of $43.32/day

Special housing Adaptation (SHA) Grant
Special housing Adaptation (SHA) Grant Veterans Benefits Administration,
VA
Tribal Members Blindnes in both eyes with 20/200 visual acuity or less, OR loss of or loss of use of both hands OR, certain severe burn injuries, OR certain severe respiratory injuries To help Veterans or their family members with certain service-connected disabilities adapt or purchase a home to accommodate the disability Maximum dollar amount allowable in FY15 is $14,093.  Temporary grant for $5,523 maxiumum of 3 grants, up to the maximum dollar allowable

Specially Adapted Housing (SAH) Grant
Specially Adapted Housing (SAH) Grant Veterans Benefits Administration,
VA
Tribal Members Loss of or loss of use of both legs OR, loss of or loss of use of both arms OR, blindness in both eyes having only light perception, plus loss of or loss of use of one leg OR, the loss of or loss of use of one lower leg together with residuals of organic disease or injury OR, the loss of or loss of use of one leg together withteh loss of or loss of use of one arm OR, certain severe burns OR, the loss or loss of use of one or more lower extremeties due to service on or after September 11, 2001, which so affects teh functinos of balance or propulsion as to preclude ambulating without teh aid of braces, crutches, canes, or a wheelchair Help Veterans with certain service-connected disabilities to
·construct a specially adapted home on land to be acquired;
·build a home on land alreadyowned if it is suitable for specially adapted housing
·remodel an existing home if it can be suitable for specially adapted housing
· apply the grant against the unpaid principal mortgage balance of an adapted home already acquired without the assistance of a VA grant
maxiumum dollar amount for FY 15 is $70,465; temporary grant for $30,934 maxiumum of 3 grants, up to the maximum dollar allowable

Native American Veterans Direct Home Loans
Native American Veterans Direct Home Loans VA Tribal Members Must have available entitlement, tribal government must have signed an MOU with the Secretary if Veterans Affairs, loan must be to purchase, construct, or improve a home on Federally-recognized trust or allotted land, Veteran must occupy the property as his or her home, must be a satisfactory credit risk, income of Veteran and Spouse must be shown to be stable and sufficient to meet mortgage payments, cover costs of other home expenses, take care of other obligations and expenses, and hvae enoughl eftover to support the family Provides direct home loans from VA to eligible Native American Veterans to finance the purchase, construction, or improvement of homes on Federal Trust land, or to refinance a prior NADL to reduce the interest rates Loans 4.0% ; subject to change due to fluctuations

NAIHC Committees

Legislative Committee
Funding Task Force

Annual Reports

Annual Report 2017
TBA

Annual Report 2016
Annual Report 2015
Annual Report 2014
Annual Report 2013
Annual Report 2012
Annual Report 2011
Annual Report 2010
Annual Report 2009
Annual Report 2006

Model Policies

For tribes TDHEs in need of a Model Policy, NAIHC has several that are HUD approved.

2CFR Part 200 Source Documents

Indian Handbook

Indian Housing Development Handbook

Revised 2013 Indian Housing Development Handbook

NAIHC 2NAIHC released the 2013 revised edition of the Indian Housing Development Handbook, which will serve as a valuable guide for tribal housing programs, federal and state government agencies, lenders, contractors, investors, attorneys and other housing professionals.

Read the full announcement

Download-indian-housing-development-handbook

Frequently Asked Questions

What is the National American Indian Housing Council (NAIHC), and what services does it provide?
Since 1974, the National American Indian Housing Council has provided housing professionals with the training, resources and information necessary to meet the housing needs of Native Americans and Alaska Natives in tribal areas. NAIHC has established a reputation as the national leader in Indian housing and works with many federal agencies, financial institutions and community groups to bring housing progress to Native people throughout Indian country.Governed by a board of 10 tribal housing professionals, all regions of the country are represented, providing a direct connection to the news, issues and progress in Indian housing.

What are the requirements for membership with NAIHC?
To be a member of the NAIHC you must be an Indian housing authority, tribally designated housing entity, housing committee, tribe, public interest group, or other entity involved in Indian housing.

What is the Native American Housing Assistance and Self-Determination Act (NAHASDA)?
Initially passed in 1996, and also known as P.L. 104-330 as amended, NAHASDA is the current federal statue that governs the Department of Housing and Urban Development’s Indian housing programs. It is the vehicle to provide Federal assistance for Indian tribes in a manner that recognizes the right of tribal self-governance, and for other purposes.

What is a Tribally Designated Housing Entity (TDHE)?
A designation by the authority (i.e., tribal council or like body) for an Indian tribe of an entity other than the tribal government to receive grant amounts and provide assistance under this NAHASDA for affordable housing activities for Indians. (Sec. 4(21) (B) of NAHASDA)

What Is the Indian Housing Block Grant (IHBG)?
The Indian Housing Block Grant (IHBG) is an annual allocation from the Department of Housing and Urban Development provided for the purposes of affordable housing activities to participating Tribes/TDHEs.

What determines the amount of IHBG funding that a Tribe or TDHE will receive?
The IHBG is determined by a formula that takes into consideration two components: the current assisted housing stock (CAS) for that Tribe/TDHE; and what the need is for that Tribe/TDHE.

How is the recipient of the IHBG for each Tribe determined?
The recipient of the IHBG is determined by the local Tribal government and can be either the Tribe itself, or a separate Tribally Designated Housing Entity (TDHE).

What role does the Tribe play under NAHASDA?
Under NAHASDA the Tribe has the ultimate decision-making authority as to the spending of the annual Indian Housing Block Grant, as well as oversight responsibility of either the Tribal housing department or TDHE.

Did you know that housing payments, rent or homebuyer, are set at the discretion of the Tribe or TDHE?
According to 24 CFR 1000.124, “A recipient can charge a low-income rental tenant or homebuyer payments not to exceed thirty percent (30%) of the adjusted income of the family. The recipient may also decide to compute its rental and homebuyer payments on any lesser percentage of adjusted income of the family. This requirement applies only to units assisted with NAHASDA grant amounts. NAHASDA does not set minimum rents or homebuyer payments; however, a recipient may do so.”

Did you know that NAIHC has been providing assistance to Tribes and their housing programs for more than 30 years?
Since its inception in 1974, NAIHC has continuously provided resources for Tribes and TDHEs and their housing programs.

How many Tribes/TDHEs has NAIHC provided Technical Assistance to on an annual basis?
In 2005 the National American Housing Council Technical Assistance staff provided services to more than 225 tribes and Alaska Native villages.

What is an Annual Performance Report (APR)?
According to Section 404 of NAHASDA “for each fiscal year, each recipient shall, (1) review the progress it has made during such fiscal year in carrying out the Indian housing plan (or plans) for the Indian tribes for which it administers grant amounts; and (2) submit a report to the Secretary (in a form acceptable to the Secretary) describing the conclusions of the review”.

Did you know that the Single Audit Act (OMB Circular A-133) has new thresholds?
Non-Federal entities that expend $300,000 ($500,000 for fiscal years ending after December 31, 2003) or more in a year in Federal awards shall have a single audit conducted.

What are internal controls as applies to Indian Housing, and why are they needed?
OMB Circular A-133 defines management controls as the organization, policies, and procedures used to reasonably ensure that

(i) programs achieve their intended results;
(ii) resources are used consistent with agency mission;
(iii) programs and resources are protected from waste, fraud, and mismanagement;
(iv) laws and regulations are followed; and
(v) reliable and timely information is obtained, maintained, reported and used for decision making.

What is an Indian Housing Plan (IHP)?
The Indian Housing Plan (IHP) is the tool which Tribes/TDHEs use to plan the activities that they will undertake in the coming year. It is the one requirement that the Tribes must meet in order to claim their IHBG allocation for that fiscal year, and is due no later than July 1 of every year.

What are Performance Measures? (24 CFR 1000.524)24 CFR 1000.524 states that the required performance measures are:
i. Within 2 years of grant award under NAHASDA no less than 90 percent of the grant must be obligated.
ii. The recipient has complied with the required certifications in its IHP and all policies and the IHP have been made available to the public.
iii. Fiscal audits have been conducted on a timely basis and in accordance with the requirements of the Single Audit Act, as applicable. Any deficiencies identified in audit reports have been addressed within the prescribed time period.
iv. Accurate annual performance reports were submitted to HUD within 60 days after the completion of the recipient’s program year.
v. The recipient has met the IHP goals and objectives in the 1-year plan and demonstrated progress on the 5-year plan goals and objectives.
vi. The recipient has substantially complied with the requirements of 24 CFR Part 1000 and all other applicable Federal statutes and regulations.

What training opportunities are available through NAIHC?
The NAIHC has many training opportunities. The first of which is the NAIHC Leadership Institute. The Leadership Institute provides state of the art practical training for Tribal Housing Professionals, and offers professional certifications for the various areas of management within TDHEs and Tribal Housing Departments. These are offered under a FEE based system.The NAIHC also offers a series of training programs through its Special Projects department. These particular training programs offer the Tribal Housing Professional and/or Tribal Leaders the opportunity to become familiar with the various aspects of Indian Housing.

How do Tribes/TDHEs request Technical Assistance from NAIHC?
Technical Assistance can be requested from the NAIHC through filling out a TA request form and submitting it to our office in Washington. This form is available on our website, http://www.naihc.net or by, calling 800-284-9165.

What are the costs associated with the NAIHC Technical Assistance program?
The Technical Assistance program offered through the NAIHC is subsidized by the federal government and is available at no cost to Tribes/TDHEs that are recipients of the Indian Housing Block Grant.

What areas can an NAIHC Technical Assistance Specialist cover?
Currently the NAIHC has 6 staff that provides Technical Assistance services. Our Technical Assistance request form lists 19 of the most common areas of inquiry. We are confident that whatever your request we have someone on staff that will have the expertise to address that need.

What determines if a Native American family is eligible for assistance under NAHASDA?
The primary market for assistance under NAHASDA is those families that are found to have an income of 80% of the median income and below. However, families wishing to purchase a home that have incomes in the 80-100% of the median are also eligible for assistance, but the Tribe/TDHE is only allowed to spend 10% of their annual IHBG allocation on this particular market.

What can the IHBG dollars be used for?
Section 202 of NAHASDA lists the Eligible Affordable Housing Activities. These are the parameters in which to create your Indian Housing Plan. These categories are broad in nature and are designed to fit your community’s needs.

If NAHASDA dollars are not spent according to NAHASDA rules are there penalties?
Title IV of NAHASDA spells out the possible consequences of failure to adhere to the rules and regulations. There are four penalties, and they can be handed down alone or in a combination. They are:

1. Delay your access to IHBG funds,
2. Reduce your IHBG by the amount that has been determined as unallowable,
3. Repay misspent dollars, or in severe cases
4. Replace the entity that is administering the IHBG.

What happened to Mutual Help contracts, executed under the 1937 Housing Act, after NAHASDA was implemented?
Because the Mutual Help and Occupancy Agreements (MHOA’s) are a legal contract, they are still in effect, even after the enactment of NAHASDA. However, the MHOA’s should be updated for use in the future to reflect the name of the organization that is now administering your local housing program, as well as any change in policies that may contradict the MHOA. Remember, the MHOA is a contract signed by both the Housing Authority and the participant; neither side can unilaterally change or disregard any part of that contract.

Must Board of Commissioner stipends be run through payroll and issued a W-2 instead of a 1099?
The IRS reference for this question may be obtained in the IRS/ITG websitehttp://www.irs.gov/tribes The I.RS has a publication that is specific for Indian Tribal Governments and titled “Employment Tax Desk Guide For Indian Tribal Governments” Publication 4268. This is an excellent resource for employment tax processing and reporting. This guide can be downloaded from their website. There are two scenarios that need to be considered as to stipend payments.

1) Tribal Council Member Wages and Tribal Council Member Stipends Chapter 3, Page 17 of the Guide address the Revenue Ruling 59-354 and gives instructions on the proper format for reporting.
2) Elected and Public Officials, Chapter 3, Page 19, 20 address Members of boards/commissions If a Tribal Council Member is serving on the board, a W2 is issued showing the total amount of payment for attending meetings, No Tax withheld.
A non council member is serving on the board, a W2 is issued showing the total amount of payment for attending meetings, Tax is withheld. A Form 1099-Misc. should not be issued to Board Members for Stipends.